☆ I n f e r n a l ☆ FASHION MEDIA PRODUCTION STUDIO ☆ IDEA INCUBATOR ☆ IMPLEMENTOR ☆

FASHION MEDIA PRODUCTION | Creative Conceptualization, Production + Direction 4 Fashion Film, Photography + Brand Design | Multimedia Journalism, Format Development + Interviews 4 Print, Online + Broadcast |

WHAT IS YOUR KINGDOM OF HEAVEN?

Contact: info@saskiareis.com
Twitter: @saskiareis
www.saskiareis.com
Bye, bye, Twitter!!
OMG, what a relief!
„To Be Defined: Fashion in Film – The Fashion in Film Symposium at London College of Fashion“

London, London College of Fashion. The week started with a panel discussion entitled „The Fashion Film – Art or Commerce?“, chaired by Pamela Gibson, Course Director of MA Fashion & Film at LCF. She was joined by Alex Fury, Fashion Director of SHOWstudio, Susie Bubble, blogger and freelance writer and Andrew Tucker, Course Director of MA Fashion Journalism and talent scout of the British Fashion Council.
Each of the panelists contributed with his   individual background and hitherto experience to the question whether   fashion film should be defined as art or commerce. This rather   provocative question apparently was supposed to enhance a discussion and   maybe it really requires an open process of opinion formation in order   to find an intellectual approach towards this exciting new film genre.   Susie Bubbles suggested to look for an interdisciplinary answer, as  Alex  Fury stated the existence of different types of fashion film, be  it  experimental or a transaltion of an image or the vision of a  designer, a  brand or a label. According to Fury, the digital editorial  or  advertising is part of the requested package nowadays and mostly  tailor  made for different formats and websites. It was also an  opportunity for  Fury to get rid of the myth that photographers are also  automatically  good filmmakers. „Those two things don´t go necessarily  hand in hand,“  Fury said. „A big name attached does not equal quality.“  However, some  people are great in crossing over. His boss for example:  Nick Knight.  Susie Bubbles persumed that „maybe someone who is really  passionate  about fashion might have an advantage“ and encouraged brands  to submit  their goods for (filmic) interpretation. In Fury´s opinion  the fashion  film will not replace the live catwalk show experience.  „Doesn´t it just  add to the choice of selections?“, he asked.
There is no doubt that the online editorials gain   more and more value. In times when established high-end magazines such   as Vogue experiment with iPad application versions including moving   image, the question is not whether the trend is moving towards an   aesthetically led genre called fashion film. Whether this genre is being   defined as art or commerce or at the interface of the two might maybe   not be answered within a panel disucssion but through attentive   observation of contemporary and upcoming examples of moving image   fashion communication.

Fashion Film "The Good Life" (2010)  by Alice  Hawkins was screened as one fashion film example during the  panel  discussion. Here Hawkins re-interprets the bourgeoisie feel of  the Paris  collections with a distinctly English slant, an English  equivalent of  the class-conscious French woman.

By Saskia Reis
Image from SHOWstudio.com

„To Be Defined: Fashion in Film – The Fashion in Film Symposium at London College of Fashion“


London, London College of Fashion. The week started with a panel discussion entitled „The Fashion Film – Art or Commerce?“, chaired by Pamela Gibson, Course Director of MA Fashion & Film at LCF. She was joined by Alex Fury, Fashion Director of SHOWstudio, Susie Bubble, blogger and freelance writer and Andrew Tucker, Course Director of MA Fashion Journalism and talent scout of the British Fashion Council.

Each of the panelists contributed with his individual background and hitherto experience to the question whether fashion film should be defined as art or commerce. This rather provocative question apparently was supposed to enhance a discussion and maybe it really requires an open process of opinion formation in order to find an intellectual approach towards this exciting new film genre. Susie Bubbles suggested to look for an interdisciplinary answer, as Alex Fury stated the existence of different types of fashion film, be it experimental or a transaltion of an image or the vision of a designer, a brand or a label. According to Fury, the digital editorial or advertising is part of the requested package nowadays and mostly tailor made for different formats and websites. It was also an opportunity for Fury to get rid of the myth that photographers are also automatically good filmmakers. „Those two things don´t go necessarily hand in hand,“ Fury said. „A big name attached does not equal quality.“ However, some people are great in crossing over. His boss for example: Nick Knight. Susie Bubbles persumed that „maybe someone who is really passionate about fashion might have an advantage“ and encouraged brands to submit their goods for (filmic) interpretation. In Fury´s opinion the fashion film will not replace the live catwalk show experience. „Doesn´t it just add to the choice of selections?“, he asked.

There is no doubt that the online editorials gain more and more value. In times when established high-end magazines such as Vogue experiment with iPad application versions including moving image, the question is not whether the trend is moving towards an aesthetically led genre called fashion film. Whether this genre is being defined as art or commerce or at the interface of the two might maybe not be answered within a panel disucssion but through attentive observation of contemporary and upcoming examples of moving image fashion communication.

Fashion Film "The Good Life" (2010) by Alice Hawkins was screened as one fashion film example during the panel discussion. Here Hawkins re-interprets the bourgeoisie feel of the Paris collections with a distinctly English slant, an English equivalent of the class-conscious French woman.

By Saskia Reis

Image from SHOWstudio.com

Why isn`t it possible to watch some of the films completely?

Is that the case? It should work! Did you check on Vimeo? X

PS: If you mean the Introspection Preview and the Aqua Trailer, well, they will be fully published soon ;)

Organizing and analysing target group research data.
Thank you guys so much for your support!!***

Log-In .. Log-Out .. Log-In .. Log-Out .. Fuck Off ..

I don´t know how much time of the day is just wasted with this constant log-in/log-out procedures. Create a new account here, sign-up there, like this and post that. I slowly turn into a human robot. And I am not alone: You should observe my course mates and me sitting in the LCF Media Lab, working on our websites and research projects. Some of us still could not manage to start their essays (I am one of them), simply because starting a web publication from scratch includes so much more than what is just seen on the screen. What you will see could be part of a comedy. When Fashion Media Production students face each other, this means they will try to throw a line or a question some time within the next 10 seconds. It is likely they have then to repeat themselves three to five times until they get heard. That doesn´t mean the other person really picked up what was said. Even though we are supposed to be strong communicators it seems we have some serious communication issues going on - but maybe this is why we study this course: to extend those capacities. However, Fashion Media Production is studied by individuals with the most characterstic facial expressions at LCF, I promise!

I hesitated making a facebook-page for HIMMELREICH* but I clearly see the advantage of reaching as many of our audience as possible and giving them the opportunity to interact. However, about this twitter-thing I am even more sceptical. Am in there now, too. Do I get stuck in meaninglessness by trying to create something that has … meaning? What´s the deal. I can always delete. First: Let´s try.


"COURSE NEWS FROM LONDON COLLEGE OF FASHION"

LONDON.   LONDON COLLEGE OF FASHION, John Princes Street. FASHION FUTURES with   MARK SIMKINS, Creative Technologist at SIX Creative, which, in his  own  words, “is just a fancy name for Project Manager.”



Mark Simkins is the man who put Vogue on the iPad, when British Vogue decided to make its first iPad App in November 2010. “Vogue   is very graphics and video  rich which came across with huge technical   challenges to convert 400  pages into the iPad,” Mark says. “They  wanted  the complete magazine plus  supplemental material in form of  video (e.g. advertising and behind-the-scenes), extra photographs and a  shop section.” HTML5 was the  predominant technology. Mark  knows that  “most print magazines do not  have a strong web presence.” According to Mark the current key trends are devices and publishing   through the iPad. At the moment high-end photographic content is  demanded on the  market.



What Vogue   missed was a proper communication with its audience before and after the   iPad implementation. Simkins knows that there was no evaluation about   the audience´s wants and needs on a Vogue iPad app. When you google   “Vogue” and “iPad” you find lots of user complaints regarding download   difficulties and cost issues. One interesting question is whether it is   user-friendly to offer the magazine´s website vogue.com on the one  hand,  and an additional iPad app you have to pay for on the other hand.  It is exciting to see the still photograph from the print issue turning  into a moving image within the application. However, what  the first  Vogue app seems to oversee is the fact that the internet is an   interactive medium. The modern Vogue reader does not want solely to   consume content passively online, s/he wants to participate and to   satisfy individual needs from a wide range of content and interactive   possibilities. The journey just started.

By Saskia Reis



Image from www.businessoffashion.com

"COURSE NEWS FROM LONDON COLLEGE OF FASHION"

LONDON. LONDON COLLEGE OF FASHION, John Princes Street. FASHION FUTURES with MARK SIMKINS, Creative Technologist at SIX Creative, which, in his own words, “is just a fancy name for Project Manager.”


Mark Simkins is the man who put Vogue on the iPad, when British Vogue decided to make its first iPad App in November 2010. “Vogue is very graphics and video rich which came across with huge technical challenges to convert 400 pages into the iPad,” Mark says. “They wanted the complete magazine plus supplemental material in form of video (e.g. advertising and behind-the-scenes), extra photographs and a shop section.” HTML5 was the predominant technology. Mark knows that “most print magazines do not have a strong web presence.” According to Mark the current key trends are devices and publishing through the iPad. At the moment high-end photographic content is demanded on the market.


What Vogue missed was a proper communication with its audience before and after the iPad implementation. Simkins knows that there was no evaluation about the audience´s wants and needs on a Vogue iPad app. When you google “Vogue” and “iPad” you find lots of user complaints regarding download difficulties and cost issues. One interesting question is whether it is user-friendly to offer the magazine´s website vogue.com on the one hand, and an additional iPad app you have to pay for on the other hand. It is exciting to see the still photograph from the print issue turning into a moving image within the application. However, what the first Vogue app seems to oversee is the fact that the internet is an interactive medium. The modern Vogue reader does not want solely to consume content passively online, s/he wants to participate and to satisfy individual needs from a wide range of content and interactive possibilities. The journey just started.

By Saskia Reis


Image from www.businessoffashion.com

Aia Air* is on board and it feels as if she has always been there.
*you can look for her but where will you find her?
HEARTCORE* for heaven …
*only 4 true lovers

INTROSPECTION Preview // INTROSPECTION is coming soon*

Just waiting for the moment when it feels right.

LONDON. Yesterday I met Liz, a Fashion Journalism graduate from LCF who is keen on joining the kingdom of heaven. It was such an inspiration to talk to her and to be with someone to share the passion with. She also helped me to gain more confidence with the idea to build up a HIMMELREICH*team here in London on location. The team will be called HARD/CORE, HEARTCORE or HARDCORE4HEAVEN and we will make a section for those spirits who are up to be part of that. Also London outsiders are welcome, but they need to be ready to take action*

Clip by Stefano Ottaviano

LONDON. LONDON ART FAIR.

A visual kaleidoscope of London Art Fair combined with audio interviews with two art enthusiast from the UK, an up-coming art enthusiast from Canada and an artist from Indonesia about the role of art in their life and what they think about the concept of HIMMELREICH*ARTEZINE.

By Saskia Reis and Gianluca Bonfiglio

Reflection on authorship and copyright in the internet

LONDON. LONDON COLLEGE OF FASHION, John Princes Street. Fashion Futures with Dr Julia Gaimster, Head of E-Learning at LCF.

I did not and do not feel uncomfortable or insecure dealing with authorship and copyright in the internet. I think the rules of authorship work differently in the internet and people feel quite free and do not care about the legal aspects of copyright so much. To me, internet is about networking and sharing - it’s even in the name: inter/net - and as long as people treat each other respectfully and quote/refer to each other’s content I don’ see why there should be any problems. My approach is communication-oriented. The internet is an experience based on trying and doing and it offers exciting ways to be creative. In a way, to put something online almost equals to offer other people to use it. As long as my actions don’t harm anyone’s feelings this shall be fine, I guess … One of the wonderful things about the internet is the ease of getting in touch with each other. Lawsuits could become redundant. Let’s celebrate the belle of dialogue! If someone feels threatened, please get in touch with me: s.reis2@fashion.arts.ac.uk

Interactive Target Group Research at London Art Fair tomorrow, Sunday 23 January 2011

HIMMELREICH* gets in touch with its audience. We believe in interactive target group research as a tool for interactive marketing and to really meet our audience´s desires and needs and are totally excited to exchange with a selection of 7 artists and/or art enthusiasts at London Art Fair. Selection criteria: bright mind, high or no heels and big smile*

Nick Knight and BoF … at The Hospital Club 26 November 2010! Check out Nick´s advise to his younger self at 30´48´´

www.businessoffashion.com